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Hello TIA crew! I am currently turning my basement into a workshop and in need of a little advice. My basement used to have a wall separating two rooms (the wall was not structural and was installed by the last homeowner) I removed the wall to make more space for a workshop I am building. Half of the floor was covered in nature stone and half in an epoxy similar to those found in a garage. I am in the process of grinding off the old epoxy so i can paint over floor with a floor paint. when  removed the nature stone (pain in the **s) I found some cracks in the concrete floor. I was wondering what would be the best way to address these cracks? I was going to grind out the cracks and use some DAP pre-mixed concrete patch I got from home depot however after doing a little research I have read that  it takes a very long time to dry and may not be the best choice. I also have some holes on the cinder block walls of the basement from when i tore down some shelves that were anchored in. What is the best way to patch these holes? (none of them are more than an inch deep, most being much smaller) Thanks in advance for any input or advice!

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Get a v grove diamond blade for a 4" grinder chase the cracks and fill then in with an epoxy crack filler depending on the width of the crack you can use a product called cement all its a heavy duty non shrink grout Home Depots stock it . You can use mortar for the small holes in walls

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I agree with the guys above, Mortar for the CMU and crack repair on the floor. I am a fan of the epoxy for crack repair. It is not very toolable by nature. I would go over it with a feather finish such as an Ardex CD fine. That way it will be smooth and ready for your floor paint. 

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Progress so far. I don't have a true before picture but the half of the basement where there was naturestone was a separate room that was drywalled and had a drop ceiling. I tore all of that out and got rid of the nature stone. I'm almost finished grinding the epoxy that was in the old workshop area. After that I will grind the other half and start addressing these cracks!IMG_0538.jpgIMG_7092.jpgIMG_7093.jpgIMG_7087.JPGIMG_7090.jpgIMG_7137.jpgIMG_7147.jpgIMG_7148.jpgIMG_7149.jpgIMG_7150.jpgIMG_7151.jpgIMG_7152.jpgIMG_7153.jpgIMG_7154.jpgIMG_7155.jpgIMG_7156.jpg

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Lack of or improper rebar placement can also cause cracking. The epoxy based stuff works awesome,every home owner should have some around.

 

My house sits on a slab so always on the lookout for cracks. 

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There are so many reasons concrete cracks, wrong mix, rebar placement, mesh placement or lack of mesh, ground movement, control joints not cut/finished in to name a few.

 

    From the pictures it looks like your slab does not have any control joints. They don't stop the concrete from cracking but give it a prestressed line to form the crack instead of a random set of cracks like you have.

 

Do you ever have water seeping through?

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There are so many reasons concrete cracks, wrong mix, rebar placement, mesh placement or lack of mesh, ground movement, control joints not cut/finished in to name a few.

 

    From the pictures it looks like your slab does not have any control joints. They don't stop the concrete from cracking but give it a prestressed line to form the crack instead of a random set of cracks like you have.

 

Do you ever have water seeping through?

Coming from a bridge guy you can generally count on concrete to do two things...get hard and crack.

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No there has never been any water. In fact the whole basement is pretty dry. I've also heard that these types of cracks can be caused by frost forming underneath  during the winter. Not sure but I'm in the process of preparing them For epoxy filler right now. I will try to get some more pics up soon. 

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Update - Crack Grindin. I finished grinding out the cracks on the basement floor as well as filled in the holes in the walls. The epoxy for the cracks should be arriving in the next few days. I have a question though. Once I have filled in the cracks with the epoxy and it has fully cured, what is the best way to sand it down to get a smooth finish? Is it best to just use regular sand paper with an orbital sander, get a flap wheel sander for the grinder, belt sander, or some other way thats better?

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Only two types of cement that I have seen or had, the kind with cracks and the kind that hasn't cracked yet. They all crack at some point. Those are some serious cracks you have there. At least they're not unlevel or raised . Nice job, looks like you will be a busy guy for a while.

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