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Why oh why Prop 65?!?!?


khariV

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So I've been eyeing the Ryobi One+ Inflator and lights.  They seem like great tools that I could definitely use.  Then I go to read the fine print and both of them and the batteries that make them go have Prop 65 warnings!

 

I know the easy answer is, wash your hands, wear gloves and don't let the wee ones near the tools, but that's just not the way my life works these days.  I can't tell you the number of times my daughter has been through my everyday tool bag asking me what each pair of pliers and each screwdriver is used for.

 

So what gives?  Why does Ryobi feel the need to use toxic $*%# in their tools?  TTI doesn't seem to do that with their Milwaukee tools.  Seems like half of the manufacturers don't give a damn about toxic chemicals (I'm looking at you, oh so tempting RIDGID tool boxes with lead in the handle rubber).

 

With the two little ones walking about whenever I'm working, it's just not worth the risk exposing them.

 

Has anyone else run into this?  Any suggestions other than vigilance for avoiding stuff you don't want ending up in your two year old's mouth (not that I really want it on my hands either or want to remember to have to wash my hands every time I pick up a screwdriver or inflate a ball).

 

kdv

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Maybe it's like the paint that was being used in toys imported from China? TTI is the manufacturer for Ryobi and Milwaukee and they are in China but thee Milwaukee site always says "professionally made" maybe there is a difference. I don't know this for a fact and it is JUST speculation.

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So if you read below you better lock yourself in your house and never leave. Just about everything you come in contact could be on the list.

 

What Is Proposition 65?

In 1986, California voters approved an initiative to address their growing concerns about exposure to toxic chemicals. That initiative became the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986, better known by its original name of Proposition 65. Proposition 65 requires the State to publish a list of chemicalsknown to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm. This list, which must be updated at least once a year, has grown to include approximately 800 chemicals since it was first published in 1987.

Proposition 65 requires businesses to notify Californians about significant amounts of chemicals in the products they purchase, in their homes or workplaces, or that are released into the environment. By providing this information, Proposition 65 enables Californians to make informed decisions about protecting themselves from exposure to these chemicals. Proposition 65 also prohibits California businesses from knowingly discharging significant amounts of listed chemicals into sources of drinking water.

The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) administers the Proposition 65 program. OEHHA, which is part of the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA), also evaluates all currently available scientific information on substances considered for placement on the Proposition 65 list.

What types of chemicals are on the Proposition 65 list?

 

What does a warning mean?

If a warning is placed on a product label or posted or distributed at the workplace, a business, or in rental housing, the business issuing the warning is aware or believes that one or more listed chemicals is present. By law, a warning must be given for listed chemicals unless exposure is low enough to pose no significant risk of cancer or is significantly below levels observed to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm.

For chemicals that are listed as causing cancer, the "no significant risk level” is defined as the level of exposure that would result in not more than one excess case of cancer in 100,000 individuals exposed to the chemical over a 70-year lifetime. In other words, a person exposed to the chemical at the “no significant risk level” for 70 years would not have more than a “one in 100,000” chance of developing cancer as a result of that exposure.

For chemicals that are listed as causing birth defects or reproductive harm, the “no observable effect level” is determined by identifying the level of exposure that has been shown to not pose any harm to humans or laboratory animals. Proposition 65 then requires this “no observable effect level” to be divided by 1,000 in order to provide an ample margin of safety. Businesses subject to Proposition 65 are required to provide a warning if they cause exposures to chemicals listed as causing birth defects or reproductive harm that exceed 1/1000th of the “no observable effect level.”

To further assist businesses, OEHHA develops numerical guidance levels, known as “safe harbor numbers” (described below) for determining whether a warning is necessary or whether discharges of a chemical into drinking water sources are prohibited. However, a business may choose to provide a warning simply based on its knowledge, or assumption, about the presence of a listed chemical without attempting to evaluate the levels of exposure. Because businesses do not file reports with OEHHA regarding what warnings they have issued and why, OEHHA is not able to provide further information about any particular warning. The business issuing the warning should be contacted for specific information, such as what chemicals are present, and at what levels, as well as how exposure to them may occur

The list contains a wide range of naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals that are known to cause cancer or birth defects or other reproductive harm. These chemicals include additives or ingredients in pesticides, common household products, food, drugs, dyes, or solvents. Listed chemicals may also be used in manufacturing and construction, or they may be byproducts of chemical processes, such as motor vehicle exhaust.

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your right regopit, I'm sure if we analyze enough we will find bad things in everything,...simply talking about things make you think badly too. talk about head lice and your head gets itchy....? I wonder how bad things really are, sure separating gold using mercury was bad...... or the mad hatters ect ect but we also have had thing around for many years that were supposed to be really bad but we lived with them.......the other thing is ask a non smoker if smoking is bad for you versus someone that has smoked for 50+ years........I remember seeing baby pictures of baby's right in the hospital with people holding them with a cigarette hanging out of their mouth including some doctors.....

 

Disclaimer: This is just an option in general not promoting anything good or bad.........

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This is the kind of stuff that drives me crazy. I have worked in two nuclear power plants. Diablo Canyon and Calvert Cliffs in the shop and I spent a lot of time in the containment area. So maybe I really should not say anything about stuff like this. Yes the warning is there for a reason but lets have some common sense about this. Then again don't lock yourself in the house you could have radon gas come from the ground below.

 

"Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas and comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium. It is usually found in igneous rock and soil, but in some cases, well water may also be a source of radon."

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years ago when I was in my racing days California was always tough on emissions in fact we would buy racing parts and some stuff had warnings "Can Not Be Installed On Vehicle Residing in California" 

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I hope you people are proud of yourselves. Right now there some ultra Liberal Professor of Magical Arts and the Feelings of the Disenchanted (Aka....Civil Liberties for ANY PERSON ANIMAL OR INANIMATE OBJECT - who or that - feels oppressed) at the University in Berkley California sitting in his/her Toyota Prius drinking water from an organic fountain located in South America out of a glass bottle gathered from the ashes of some volcano in Italy, while wearing Hemp shorts, Yak sweater and Birkenstocks softly sobbing as a pure tear rolls down his/her cheek. Nice job guys. I hope you can look at yourself in the mirror.

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I hope you people are proud of yourselves. Right now there some ultra Liberal Professor of Magical Arts and the Feelings of the Disenchanted (Aka....Civil Liberties for ANY PERSON ANIMAL OR INANIMATE OBJECT - who or that - feels oppressed) at the University in Berkley California sitting in his/her Toyota Prius drinking water from an organic fountain located in South America out of a glass bottle gathered from the ashes of some volcano in Italy, while wearing Hemp shorts, Yak sweater and Birkenstocks softly sobbing as a pure tear rolls down his/her cheek. Nice job guys. I hope you can look at yourself in the mirror.

 

I think that you have been wearing the Bosch capris way to long, and yes I can still look at myself

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i'm with you Rego,

use common sense and avoid obvious and real dangers as best as you can but there is no sense living in paranoia about the harmful effects of everything around you .. were all going to be brain dead from cell phones one day anyway  :P

 

it would be nice if manufacturers would do the ethical thing and avoid using materials that obviously harmful and where a suitable replacement exists.. thats a hard one to judge and enforce though

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  • 10 months later...

So I've been eyeing the Ryobi One+ Inflator and lights.  They seem like great tools that I could definitely use.  Then I go to read the fine print and both of them and the batteries that make them go have Prop 65 warnings!

 

I know the easy answer is, wash your hands, wear gloves and don't let the wee ones near the tools, but that's just not the way my life works these days.  I can't tell you the number of times my daughter has been through my everyday tool bag asking me what each pair of pliers and each screwdriver is used for.

 

So what gives?  Why does Ryobi feel the need to use toxic $*%# in their tools?  TTI doesn't seem to do that with their Milwaukee tools.  Seems like half of the manufacturers don't give a damn about toxic chemicals (I'm looking at you, oh so tempting RIDGID tool boxes with lead in the handle rubber).

 

With the two little ones walking about whenever I'm working, it's just not worth the risk exposing them.

 

Has anyone else run into this?  Any suggestions other than vigilance for avoiding stuff you don't want ending up in your two year old's mouth (not that I really want it on my hands either or want to remember to have to wash my hands every time I pick up a screwdriver or inflate a ball).

 

kdv

 

 

 

The warning that you referenced is required in accordance with California’s Proposition 65.  A Proposition 65 warning does not necessarily mean a product is in violation of any product-safety standards or requirements. This product has been thoroughly tested, is safe for consumer use, and meets all required industry standards.  Many consumer products that are sold in California are required to make this warning available to consumers.  For more information concerning Proposition 65 please visit the following website:

 

http://www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65.html

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...
Idiotic thread IMO. Everything on the face of the earth has been tied to cancer in some way. Don't listen to junk science.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2015/oct/30/an-extensive-and-exhaustive-and-definitely-correct-list-of-everything-that-will-give-you-cancer

I think cancer gives you cancer...

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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we live in a world where we want things at our finger tips, most things done for us or things that help us do things easier, eat food that is hunted cooked and near fed to us, machines to carry us to and from work, change channels on our TV's from the comforts of our chairs, cordless phones so we don't have to move in case it rings, the list goes on and on.......

 

Proposition 65 and what it claims is the least of our problems......

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