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Can a Tile Saw used for wood cutting?


louuisc

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Can a tile saw used for wood cutting (to replace a circular saw if the timber is not too thick)? And of course use a blade for cutting wood rather than abrasive blade.   

 

The reason I want to do this is that common circular saws are 165/185mm blade size, whereas common tile saws are 110mm that are very compact and lightweight, easy to operate and great for weekend DIY jobs. 

 

Apart from the size, obvious wet cutting features and default abrasive blades, the only difference I've noticed is that the RRP is a lot higher  e.g.12,000rpm

whereas common circular saws RRP is around 5000rpm 

 

So would this be a problem? 

 

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These are couple examples of tile saws

https://sydneytools.com.au/makita-4100nh3zx-1200w-110mm-4-1-3-diamond-cutter-saw

https://sydneytools.com.au/makita-4101rh-110mm-860w-wet-cutting-tile-saw

 

I also notice that there are some so called circular saws, where the blade wheel size is 140mm, which could sweet tradeoff for my like but just wondering despite the name metal circular saws, can they be used to cut wood with proper wood cutting blade?

https://sydneytools.com.au/milwaukee-hd18ms-0-18v-li-ion-cordless-136mm-5-1-3-metal-circular-saw-skin-only

https://sydneytools.com.au/dewalt-dcs373n-xe-18v-xr-li-ion-cordless-metal-cutting-circular-saw-skin-only

 

 

 

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This is something many people do here in India, because tile cutters are much cheaper than circular saw.
However, as you have mentioned yourself, it is very dangerous because of the nearly double RPMs. The kickback is much more violent. In fact, I read a few days ago, of a man dying because he tried to use his angle grinder on a wood stump and ended up slashing his throat because of the kickback. His wife came home to find him bled to death.

You could possibly use it on thin stock but I, and possibly others as well, would suggest you to be safe and not do that.

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Comp56 is right carbide tipped blades fr cutting wood are not designed for the many RPMs. Also there is a reason they are called Tile saws, Metal saws, They are designed to cut those materials not wood. The bottom line is what are YOU willing to risk.  

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You can chance anything and hope for good results. Radial saws were phased out due to better tools being made. They were notorious for kickback and pulling the worker into the blade. I just sold mine after it sat around collecting dust. Only used it for cutting 2x4s. It was dangerous to use and it was made for cutting wood but it was the best option at the time.  You could clamp pieces down and ya it would probably work.  But when it fails will it be worth the money saved? With the amount of options available is the risk worth the savings? Only you can answer that. I'd say no but i also have the tools i need. Ive done some sketch things to get a job done. Most of us have.  Using a tile saw for wood isn't one of those things. I wouldn't recommend using it. 

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2 hours ago, Jronman said:

if say someone had 2 clamps on each side of the wood, could a tile saw be used without the risk of kickback?

The problem with clamping two sides of wood IS kickback! The wood will get bound up in the blade bro!

 

For instance....my Kapex, like my Ridgid before it and my Craftsman before that has two clamp holders, one per side. The saw comes with one clamp though. The reason behind it is if you clamp both sides your wood can get bound in the blade and cause a catostrophic need to change your underwear. 

 

Ultimately, of the tool is purpose built for a purpose, I'd let it perform that action. Tile saws are super fast to make cutting those tiles a breeze with a specialty blade whereas a table saw, though fast, is spinning at a slower speed. Take into consideration the size of the blade that sits on the arbor. A tile blade is much heavier than a thin or thick kerf blade. Now you are throwing the balance of the machine off. Ultimately, it's an accident waiting to happen!

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2 hours ago, Jronman said:

if say someone had 2 clamps on each side of the wood, could a tile saw be used without the risk of kickback?

the clamps, the wood or the saw itself is not the problem it is the blade that can come apart from such high RPM's. when that flies apart there is nothing left to do but cry.....

but Chris is right clamps in the wrong place can cause bigger problems

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20 minutes ago, comp56 said:

the clamps, the wood or the saw itself is not the problem it is the blade that can come apart from such high RPM's. when that flies apart there is nothing left to do but cry.....

but Chris is right clamps in the wrong place can cause bigger problems

Agreed but I was responding directly to the question relative to using two clamps, on both sides of the blade. If he had the correct blade on a modified tile saw or a regular saw the possibility of wood binding would be a real issue. But yeah, a regular blade on this type of saw would more likely than not be thrown off balance, have the arbor hole elongated or simply come apart in a crescendo of feces :)

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31 minutes ago, ChrisK said:

Agreed but I was responding directly to the question relative to using two clamps, on both sides of the blade. If he had the correct blade on a modified tile saw or a regular saw the possibility of wood binding would be a real issue. But yeah, a regular blade on this type of saw would more likely than not be thrown off balance, have the arbor hole elongated or simply come apart in a crescendo of feces :)

you can't make apple pie with a toaster, well I guess you could if you modify it enough........

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4 hours ago, comp56 said:

you can't make apple pie with a toaster, well I guess you could if you modify it enough........

Funny enough, if you put the toaster on its side, it works fantastic to reheat small pieces of pizza!!  I've taken a toaster with me to work with some slices of leftover pizza for that purpose MMHHMM YUM

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16 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Funny enough, if you put the toaster on its side, it works fantastic to reheat small pieces of pizza!!  I've taken a toaster with me to work with some slices of leftover pizza for that purpose MMHHMM YUM

you guys, whats amadda for you? you can't eat pizza from a toaster? ya whadda gonna do?

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12 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Well, out in the field, no oven handy, it was great, beats heating it in a microwave, plus i can't stand cold pizza

my point is if your heating it in a toaster, it ain't pizza...lol to me that's like boiling a hamburger bun and all....lol

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13 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Well, out in the field, no oven handy, it was great, beats heating it in a microwave, plus i can't stand cold pizza

Don't even pretend like you've never fallen asleep eating pizza and then woke up, looked down and thought, "sweet, breakfast is ready."

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