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construction/home builder tool list


silverado79

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i'm hopefully going into the construction/home building trade within the next year and so far here's what i'm planning on getting

 

dewalt Tstaks and tough boxes

dewalt tool belt with pouches

m18 fuel hammer drill, circular saw, and sawzall

20v max drill driver and impact driver

Klein insulated pliers and wire strippers

channellock code blue pliers, screwdrivers and nutdrivers

estwing hammers 

vaughn superbar

empire 48" and 72" levels, speed square, and carpenters square

komelon 200' tape

irwin chalk reel

and werner and louisville ladders 

 

if you have opinions or know of something better or if i left something out please reply  

 

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Insulated pliers are a monster waste. If you insist on DIY electrical and you are not a electrician you will get hurt and or destroy something. Save your life and business and hire a electrician. That being said if you insist on DIY, electrical tape is 600 volt rated, so wrap any screwdrivers you want to use in live work with plenty of electrical tape and you will be fine for any residential setting. 

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Insulated pliers are a monster waste. If you insist on DIY electrical and you are not a electrician you will get hurt and or destroy something. Save your life and business and hire a electrician. That being said, electrical tape is 600 volt rated, so wrap any screwdrivers you want to use in live work with plenty of electrical tape and you will be fine for any residential setting.

that's a cool idea I've never heard that before thanks for the input everyone
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I would suggest picking one line of cordless tools, since the batteries would be interchangeable. Batteries & Chargers are a HUGE expense when you are looking at tool kits VS bare tools.

I was planning to them all in kits except for the sawzall
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Insulated pliers are a monster waste. If you insist on DIY electrical and you are not a electrician you will get hurt and or destroy something. Save your life and business and hire a electrician. That being said, electrical tape is 600 volt rated, so wrap any screwdrivers you want to use in live work with plenty of electrical tape and you will be fine for any residential setting.

I can't recommend you wrap Tools with electrical tape and use them as "insulated", home or professional use. Although many contractors do it.. It's not best practice. More goes into insulated tools then just a coating of plastic and the effect can not be duplicated by wrapping electrical tape around a handle. The biggest problem is that you will try to use the tool on energized circuits... Never work on energized circuits! I would say generally you won't need insulated tools, but if you have the cash, they are good for safety.. Just in case you cut through or touch a live wire. A better way to spend your money is by buying a multimeter or voltage probe. It might save your life... Knowing when an outlet or fan is live. Nothing worse the falling off a ladder because of an unexpected shock.
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I can't recommend you wrap Tools with electrical tape and use them as "insulated", home or professional use. Although many contractors do it.. It's not best practice. More goes into insulated tools then just a coating of plastic and the effect can not be duplicated by wrapping electrical tape around a handle. The biggest problem is that you will try to use the tool on energized circuits... Never work on energized circuits! I would say generally you won't need insulated tools, but if you have the cash, they are good for safety.. Just in case you cut through or touch a live wire. A better way to spend your money is by buying a multimeter or voltage probe. It might save your life... Knowing when an outlet or fan is live. Nothing worse the falling off a ladder because of an unexpected shock.

I said that he should never work on energized circuits firstly. But if someone truly insists on working on a 120v receptacle live electrical tape will work perfectly fine. 600v tape is 600v insulated for a reason after all. If you cant trust the tape to insulate for 120v then who the hell would use it to insulated 600v?

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I said that he should never work on energized circuits firstly. But if someone truly insists on working on a 120v receptacle live electrical tape will work perfectly fine. 600v tape is 600v insulated for a reason after all. If you cant trust the tape to insulate for 120v then who the hell would use it to insulated 600v?

A pin hole will negate the voltage rating of anything that's insulated, even a proper tool. Every insulated tool requires regular inspection and testing to insure its ratting. Tape is rated but not for warping tools. I have my OSHA 30 and electrical safety, I'm not talking out of my ass over here. I deal with UL a few times a year and design electronics. You can do what ever you want to do, wrap what ever you want to wrap, but I'm going to cut you off and warn against anything that's not safe. The poster can use the info how he sees fit. As far as a 600v rating, don't forget to de-rate and remember that ratings are assumed for intended purpose under optimal conditions and do not guarantee when used improperly. Tape is not designed to take the kind of abrasion and sheer force a hand tool is subjected to, that's why OEM can't just wrap tools and sell them as rated. Sweaty hands and nicked tape = death.

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http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/82646902?src=pla&008=-99&pcrid=15557577904&007=Search&006=15557577904&005=21882504424&004=4409695744&002=2167139&mkwid=sJXegN7a0%7Cdc&cid=PLA-Google-PLA+-+Test_sJXegN7a0_PLA__15557577904_c_S&026=-99&025=c&item=82646902

 

I use these screwdrivers, they are tested to 10,000 VAC and certified for 1,000 VAC usage. Plus they have a carrying case to keep them safe. And they include the main tips you might encounter. Klein insulated pliers and these would make a good combo for any hot work you desire. Just we said just check to make sure they are insulated and functioning properly. 

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Off topic from the last ones is like to second woodstockva's comments about sticking to a line. It allows you to buy a single kit then expand your tool line without having to spend money on extra batteries.

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I don't think a panther has a whole lot of money. All they do is give him pink insulation to eat that's all he asks for in his contract. How do you think the Pink Panther got pink in the first place? He loves the taste of Owens Corning.

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I can't recommend you wrap Tools with electrical tape and use them as "insulated",

I agree with this, it is dangerous especially for someone not used to working with electrical on a daily basis.  I wrap some of my drivers but complacency has lead to blowing up the side of boxes etc.  Especially the pliers, it is impossible to wrap them as tight as the manufacturer coats them.  As an electrician I do carry Non-insulated tools but thats because working live isn't as common as dead.  They are expensive but well worth the investment.  

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  • 1 month later...

If you are getting into construction and one day go out on your own you will be buying tools to the day you retire.

This is very true! Don't expect to buy all the tools you need right off the bat, it's great to cover the basics but some tools should be purchased when the need arises especially when starting out. If you own your own business you will amass hundreds and hundreds of tools costing tens of thousands of dollars, and that's not getting crazy with big machinery and equipment.

If starting a house building business first and foremost find a good set of subs. electrical, plumbing, hvac are things that you most likly can not do on a permitted job unless your specifically liscensed. other trades that you might want to consider subbing based on the fact that they are (in my opinion) high labor and some are low cost trades are; site work, concrete, insulation, drywall... roofing, while not the worst often requires a separate (much more expensive) liability insurance policy so consider subbing that too. One thing that you need to know, and I'm still learning is you can't do it all!

As far as actual tools... few solid sets of saw horses are essential on almost every job, Trojan, while expensive, makes a Incredible set of horses and they will no doubt last you your entire career. . Also invest in a compressor and some nail guns. Framing/sheathing gun, trim guns... whatever you expect to be doing will most likely require lots of nails and nothing compares to the speed of a nail gun. Rolair makes a great compressor, the jc10 is super nice and unless you expect to be using multiple framing or roofing guns at the same time, should cover all your needs. . You could also consider ditching the compressor and going all cordless guns (maybe minus serious roofing)

Good luck

John

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